A Different Take On Bassai Sho Karate Kata Bunkai

The 2 Bassai katas (patterns/forms), Bassai Dai and Bassai Sho are thought to have been authored be the martial arts genius, Soken Matsumura.  Matsumura was head bodyguard to the King of Okinawa in the mid to late 1800’s.  Bassai is often translated as “storming the fortress”, which is very ironic, as Matsumura being head bodyguard for the King, with most of the official work being conducted in the Shuri Castle, would in fact of been defending the fortress (Shuri Castle) rather than storming it.
Continue reading “A Different Take On Bassai Sho Karate Kata Bunkai” »

Do Traditional Martial Arts Really Work Under Pressure?

This is an old chestnut that keeps going around every now and again; do traditional martial arts really work under pressure in the street?

Many people argue that they don’t, after all, we’ve all heard of a story where a black belt in whatever style ends up getting beaten up by a street fighter.  There are also lots of stories of martial artists, some even quite low grade, who have used their martial arts to successfully defend themselves.  Which story you quote depends on which side of the debate you’re on.

Now when you consider that there are literally millions of people around the world who practice martial arts, just by the law of averages there are bound to be some who are successful in defending themselves and some who are not.  So until somebody can come up with some studies and statistical data (I’m not aware of anybody doing so yet) I think we have to be careful how much we read too much into such stories. Continue reading “Do Traditional Martial Arts Really Work Under Pressure?” »

Tekki/Naihanchi Shodan – Partner To Pad Drill

Brian Bates practising kata
Brian Bates demonstrating Karate kata

I saw this video today and liked it, so I thought I’d share it.

It features Brian Bates, 4th Dan of Zanshin Karate Academy who I’ve had some interaction with via Facebook.  He’s very good at Karate kata practical applications (bunkai) having trained with many of the top kata bunkai experts in the UK and also having a background in Aiki Jujutsu, which gives him considerable extra insights.

This video looks at the Karate kata, Tekki/Naihanchi Shodan.  What’s clever about it, which you don’t often see, is that he demonstrates the applications to the kata movements with a partner, and he also does them with pads so that you practice and hit the target hard at the same time.  So without further ado, here’s Brian’s video: Continue reading “Tekki/Naihanchi Shodan – Partner To Pad Drill” »

Kata Bunkai From Jion Kata

Haven’t done a bunkai video for a while, so here we are taking a look at the opening salutation from Kata Jion (same as Jiin and Jitte),and also quite similar to the salutation or Bassai Dai.

I have to apologise that the battery run out just before the end, but I hope you enjoy it anyway.

Differences Between Karate and Tang Soo Do

As usual with any such comparisons on the differences between styles, we have to accept that all comments are generalisations as there are many styles of Karate and Tang Soo Do, so it’s impossible to make comparisons which hold true for every single style of Karate and every single style of Tang Soo Do.

Also, I have to say that although I have had influences from many different martial arts I am primarily a Karateka and have not Continue reading “Differences Between Karate and Tang Soo Do” »

Practical Application For Haito Uchi: Ridge Hand Strike

A strike that is often not very well explained is the Ridge Hand Strike.  The focus is usually on striking with the hand, making it of limited use under pressure as it requires quite a lot of accuracy and the small bones in the hand can be damaged if they strike the wrong target.

A simple modification to focus on striking with the forearm makes it more powerful, requires less accuracy (very useful under pressure), can be used at multiple ranges, reduces the chances of Continue reading “Practical Application For Haito Uchi: Ridge Hand Strike” »

The Bunkai Challenge: Iain Abernethy Vs Jesse Enkamp

This is a light hearted fun challenge from Jesse Enkamp to Iain Abernethy.  The rules are that each of them chooses a movement from any Kata and the other one has to give a practical street application to that movement.

The judges . . . . . well anybody watching the video can put there vote in the comments section (in Youtube) below the video. Continue reading “The Bunkai Challenge: Iain Abernethy Vs Jesse Enkamp” »

Comparison Of Bare Knuckle Boxing/Pugilism & Traditional Martial Arts

I was a little intrigued recently when I came across the picture below on Facebook depicting a bare knuckle prize fight that took place in 1877.  What intrigued me was that the punch being delivered looks a lot more like a punch that we’d find in Karate/Taekwondo/some styles of Kung Fu, than it does a modern boxing punch!  The back is straight, head up, legs are practically identical to our forward stance, hips turned square on and shoulder not turned in as much as a modern boxers.  Continue reading “Comparison Of Bare Knuckle Boxing/Pugilism & Traditional Martial Arts” »

Kiai/Kihap/Chi Shout – Is It Really Necessary?

Many martial arts, especially the Oriental ones include the practice of shouting at certain points in training.  Japanese styles call it Kiai, Korean styles call it Kihap.  I don’t know what the Chinese word for it is, but I have trained with some who simply called it Chi Shout.  For simplicity, I’m just going to stick the Japanese notation of Kiai (as I’m primarily a Japanese stylist and it’s the version I’m most familiar with)!

First of all, what is it?  Very simplistically, it’s a Continue reading “Kiai/Kihap/Chi Shout – Is It Really Necessary?” »