Developing And Using Intuition For Self Protection

“The brain processes 400 billion bits of information a second but we’re only aware of 2,000 of those.  That means that reality is happening in the brain all the time”.
Joseph Dispenza from the DVD: What The Bleep Do We Know?!

If you were to look at a tree, you could probably see every leaf on that tree (depending on angle etc).  But would you know how many leaves were on that tree?

No!

If you tried to recall in great detail let’s say your 5th birthday, could you do it?

No!

Yet under hypnosis people have been taken back to events in their early life (such as early birthdays) and they can recall the events of the day in great detail.  The brain is a phenomenal computer with massive retention of detail, be it the number of leaves on a tree or what present your Aunt Gertrude gave you on your 5th birthday, how it was wrapped and that fact that you already had one of them from the previous Christmas!  But do you need that much recall?  If you went through your whole life with all these facts, figures and memories bouncing around, it would be hard to function due to the overload of information.  That is why our brains have filters, which cuts out some of the information that we perceive we simply don’t need.  They serve to keep our conscious mind only fed with the amount of information it can cope with and primarily focused on the most important things.  For example, you become aware of the car coming down the road as you cross over, rather than how many petals there are on the tulips in the garden on the other side.  One piece of information could save your life, so it prioritised over the other which will generally be filtered out.

Sometimes these filters malfunction a bit.  Have you ever had the experience where you’ve lost something, looked all over for it and been unable to find it, then some clever bugger comes in as says “here it is”, in a place that you looked closely at several times.  You wonder how on Earth you could possibly have missed it!

Basically, your own brain sometimes gets a block and filters out information that you need, but fortunately this is not that common.

These filters are of course largely based on our upbringing and life experiences telling us what is and isn’t important.  However, we can often get things wrong and we can easily be filtering out important pieces of information!

Our social conditioning too can affect us.  Is that guy offering to help carry a ladies groceries just being an old fashioned gentleman or is he trying to find an excuse to get closer to her and perhaps attack her later?  Sometimes social conditioning and education causes our logic to over-ride a gut feeling.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m not suggesting that any guy who offers to help is a potential rapist, but you can see how if somebody is raised to expect good manners, they may overlook some other warning sign!

“Your mind has a spam filter on it, just like your email.  There are literally billions of calculations going on every second just in your body alone”.
“Your spam filter is blocking out everything that is not important to you.  Until you tell your brain that something is important, then it will keep it filtered out”.
Andy Shaw, author of Creating A Bug Free Mind.

Bearing in mind that we are capable of taking in vastly more information than we are consciously aware of; sometimes our unconscious mind will notice something that our conscious mind has missed.

Maybe that friendly looking guy who is being so helpful was in the newspaper last year as a rape suspect or mugger.  Your conscious mind doesn’t have a chance of remembering, but your unconscious mind does.  The unconscious mind cannot communicate this directly to the conscious mind, but it can communicate by emotions.  It can give you that gut-feeling we call intuition!

I know this is a simplistic example, but it can take many forms.  Let’s say for example that you’re walking home late at night and you have 2 options of which route to take.  For no apparent reason, one of them just doesn’t feel comfortable.  Your logical mind tells that this route is shorter, reasonably well lit and you can’t find a good reason why you don’t feel safe.  Perhaps your conscious mind has forgotten that you saw some shady looking character walking down that way earlier and your unconscious is concerned that they might still be lurking around.  It sends you an uncomfortable “feeling” to warn you.

I’ve always believed that women tend to be more intuitive than men, as men rely on logic more.  Sometimes logic is good, but sometimes it can be our undoing as there is a time and place for both.  Women for example, often know when they are being lied to, yet if you ask them how they know; very often they don’t have a clue.  They just know, their intuition tells them.  The giveaway signs of a tiny shift in a person’s body language, maybe lack of eye contact, some almost undetectable change in tonality; the unconscious mind receives it all and process it even if the conscious mind can’t.

So intuition can be a useful life skill in relationships, work, whilst driving, just about any facet of life including of course your self-protection.  As with the examples above, it can save us getting into a dangerous situation in the first place by listening to the gut feeling which defies our logic and social conditioning.

Assuming that you gone somewhere and everything is fine, no warning signals and everybody is happy; then suddenly out of the blue without any warning, somebody starts to pick a fight.  When somebody is picking a fight there are certain clues as to when they are actually going to stop talking and threatening and actually physically attack.  That is not the subject of this post as to cover it properly would take too long.  However, if you want to pursue this subject in depth then I recommend Geoff Thompson’s book, Dead Or Alive.

If you asked most people to list the signs that a physical attack is imminent, most people wouldn’t really be able to give an in depth answer.  However, your unconscious mind will pick up every sign and feed it back to you, if only you are able to be aware able to notice these signals.

Even in a more friendly setting like a competition or just club sparring, some people seem to have the uncanny ability to automatically know just when their opponent is about to move no matter how much the opponent tries not to telegraph their technique.  It is almost as if some people can “read” their opponents.  This is basically intuition.  Their years of training have taught them to read every sign, even the slightest of change of breath, the slightest change in facial expression or bodily tension before an before the opponent attacks, which gives away their intention.  Again, the defender may not actually consciously realise that they know these signs or what these signs actually are, but their unconscious has long since learnt to recognise them.  And if their conscious mind is calm and quiet, it is able to receive this warning information from the unconscious mind.

Developing your intuition is almost a side effect of Mushin (calming the mind and silencing the inner voice).  The silenced conscious mind can receive ideas from the unconscious mind.  It can receive, acknowledge and respond to the emotions sent by the unconscious mind in the form of a gut feeling or intuition.  You could call it an instinctive knowing.  I say “almost” a side effect of Mushin, because when we start to feel these intuitions, even if we have become good at Mushin, we still have to take the leap of faith and actually trust these messages that we have started to receive.  Even if we can think very clearly in a crisis, we still have to learn to trust that sometimes we don’t need to think, we just need to allow ourselves to respond automatically without any thought at all.

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Are You Struggling To Find New Students?

British Combat Karate Association logoI’ve recently received the following message in a newsletter from the British Combat Karate Association about getting new students for your martial arts club.  I do find that the BCKA is very supportive to it’s members on many levels and tries to help them in any way that they can.  I therefore thought I’d forward that message in it’s entirety in case it is of help to anybody else:-

When you start your martial arts school, getting students into your dojo is the most important and probably the most difficult part of the process. The way your teachers built their student base no longer works as effectively as it once did and new students no longer wait for a leaflet to fall through their door before starting a new hobby in the martial arts. People are taking action more than ever before and they are looking for you, but how do they find you?

How can you hope to attract new students if they don’t even know you are teaching?

The question you need to ask yourself is ‘How effective are my methods of getting new students?’. When you post leaflets through doors or hope for your reputation to spread via word of mouth you have no control over if your message is being seen by the people you want to join your school. To get new students you need to be seen in the places they are looking.

People no longer search the yellow pages when they want to start something new. All the information they need is right at their fingertips via the internet and I guarantee, the first thing they do when they want to try something new is to search online to find something close to them.

Where do you appear when people search for a martial arts school in their area?

I am passionate about the amount of great people out there changing lives with martial arts. What I really want is to help you to access more people in your area so you can build your school into something that makes you money and more importantly helps you to serve your community.

Most of you have spent years training to reach a point where you feel you can teach others. Now is the time to really push that message and put yourself out there so you can pass on your skills and knowledge to the next generation and believe me, the next generation will be looking for you online.

Help your potential students to find you online

I want to offer you the opportunity to have your very own website that will help you to get new students and build your reputation as a great martial arts school. The best bit is you will probably only need to get 1 or 2 new students a month in order to cover your costs. My aim is to make it affordable for you bring your school into the 21st century and offer your students the best service you possibly can.

Marketing yourself online is much cheaper and more more effective than traditional forms of marketing and having a website is something that is required if you want your school to survive and thrive. Look at the people who are at the top of the game in the martial arts. People like Peter Consterdine, Geoff Thompson, Iain Abernethy and many more. They have all built great online communities and that is how they communicate their message to a wider audience and have also managed to sustain a brilliant business.

Here’s what Geoff Thompson has to say about having a website:

“Without a good website it is pretty difficult these days to do any business at all. Nearly everything in the business world demands an online presence, not just a site but a well-designed, well run and current www address. I know for me personally, when someone is interested is doing business, the first thing I do is check out their web-site. If they haven’t got one, alarm bells ring. And when I meet people with a view to future business, the first thing I do is send them to my own site, I know they will not be disappointed. A website is vital if you want to expand into the world of commerce.”

But isn’t having a website is too expensive?

When I started out I thought exactly the same thing but it doesn’t have to be. I created this package because I wanted to make websites affordable to people who just couldn’t afford to pay out thousand of pounds for something they couldn’t see the value in.

Here are some of the benefits you get from our package –

⁃ Custom designed for you so it reflects who you are and what you do

⁃ Unlimited Blog entries so you can write about what you are doing and communicate with new and existing students

⁃ The ability for people to share your website on Social Media like Facebook and twitter so they can spread your message to

⁃ Search engine optimised so when people search on Google for a martial arts schools in your area they will find your site

⁃ Content Management system so you can easily make changes yourself

⁃ URL purchase so you website address matches your MA school name

⁃ A bespoke email address to match your website

⁃ 1.5 hours per month for any help or advice you might need

⁃ No hidden fees

So how much will all of this cost?

Not as much as you might think. Lots of website designer throw around costs that reach into the thousands which simply isn’t affordable for new schools and most existing schools. I don’t want to charge you anything like that.

With our package you actually get your website for free when join our 12 month site management programme. The site management programme includes everything stated above and I will even send you a manual showing you how to manage your new site. You are involved in ever step of the design process so you don’t have to worry about being stuck with anything you don’t like.

As I said before, a site like this could cost you thousands of pounds but all you have to pay is £60 per month for 12 months. This even includes the hosting your site so you don’t have to worry about any extra hidden fees. As I said before, you will only need to get a couple of students from your site and you will already have covered your costs.

Maybe you have a website but it isn’t performing as well as you would like. We can still help.

So… Do you want to be a martial arts school of the future?

If you want to build your student base and increase your martial arts schools profile then all you need to do is get in touch by emailinginfo@lcoco.co.uk or calling us on our FREE phone number 0808 178 6111.

We look forward to hearing from you soon,

The L’Coco Designs Team

 

LouisThompson1

The man behind L’Coco is Louis Thompson, who I interviewed back in 2011.  I’ve not experienced the service so I can’t in all honesty recommend it or give any give any kind of feedback as of yet.

Having said that, Louis is an extremely competent and proficient martial artist, so you’d not be dealing with some computer geek who knows nothing about martial arts.  Furthermore, the Thompson family do know a lot about marketing and promotion, which is a good thing too.  It’s not often that many of us have access to a combination like that to help us!

I have made my own enquiries and if you are in a position that you want to expand your club then I would suggest that this is a very good starting place to at least look into.

 

 

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Naihanchi (Tekki) Karate Kata Bunkai By Ryan Parker (Ryukyu Martial Arts)

I have recently been sent some excellent videos via Youtube on rules for interpreting bunkai (applications), examples of bunkai and training drills for Naihanchi Kata by Ryan Parker of Ryukyu Martial Arts, from his own Youtube Channel, The Contemplative2.
Note:  Naihanchi Kata in Okinawan Karate is known as Tekki in some Japanese styles.

Having previously done some Youtube videos myself with a friend who does Wing Chun where we looked at similarities between Wing Chun and Naihanchi/Tekki kata bunkai, I was taken by how these videos also had so many similarities with Wing Chun close quarters trapping/striking and flow drills.  As mentioned before, Karate is largely derived from White Crane Kung Fu, whilst Wing Chun is largely derived from Snake and Crane Kung Fu, so there is a common lineage between the two systems.

In this first video, Sensei Parker looks at 2 rules for interpreting bunkai in a very straight-forward step by step manner, demonstrating how to interpret which hand is defending/trapping and which hand is striking/locking and also how to interpret what direction you should be in relative to your opponent.  This is built up into flow drills, including how to maintain control of your opponent as he tries to counter your moves.  I won’t try to explain it all hear as that is done so much better by the video itself.  All I will say is that having done a lot of Shotokan Karate and some Wing Chun myself, parts of this video will be more familiar to Wing Chun exponents than most Shotokan Karateka!

The second video builds on the first one and goes more into “Renzoku” drills.  These are not bunkai, or self defence drills, they are just drills which are designed to teach specific skill sets.

 

The final video goes through the Naihanchi kata and demonstrates a number of it’s bunkai.  In Sensie Parkers own words:

“These are just old tapes which I made for individual students as reference material to study. They weren’t intended to impress anyone (as they were made for people I trained with many times a week). The kata is just done in “walk-through” mode without any koshi action.

The bunkai are also done pretty lackadaisically, without any speed, power, or much attention to form and are just meant to be a memory aid”.

I hope you’ve enjoyed these videos.  To find out more about Sensei Parker, to contact him or read his own blog, go to http://ryukyuma.blogspot.co.uk.

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Being “Present” (In The Now) And Martial Arts Training

Many self development/spiritual teachers’ today talk about “being present” or “living in the now” (which is the same thing really).  It’s also part of Zen, which is often goes hand in hand with martial arts.  But what does this actually mean, how can martial arts training help you achieve it and what benefits are there for you from both a self protection and everyday life point of view?

Let’s start with what is meant by “being present” or “living in the now”?  This is a big subject which many books have been written about, so this is just a short overview.  Many people spend most of their time living in regret over things they’ve done wrong, things they should have done but didn’t, things that other people have done to them, missed opportunities; whatever!  They are spending a lot time focusing on their past and generally feeling bad and unhappy with it.

Others spend their time daydreaming about the future (long or short term).  They feel that they’ll be happy when they get home from work, finish that course they’re doing, get a better job, leave a job, when they’re married, when their divorce comes through, when they go on holiday, when they get back home and can relax; whatever.  These people are postponing being happy until sometime in the future so again they are feeling bad or unhappy in the present moment.  This is not to say that we don’t make plans for the future or set goals; it is to say that stay present while do actually plan and goal-set and that we don’t postpone being happy until our plans and goals are achieved!

In both cases, those concerned are focusing their attention on being somewhere other than where they are now.  Either they feel that they can’t be happy because of their past or they feel they can’t be happy until some future events happen.  In the meantime they are physically in the present moment though mentally they are not.  As many Eastern and holistic philosophies tell us, we cannot really be content until mind and body are one (in this case, mind focusing on the present where the body is).  The more you put of being happy where you are now, the more you will never be properly happy and at peace with yourself at all.  This is one of the key components to the Eastern ideal of reaching enlightenment.  There is of course much to it than that and this is a very simplified overview.

Being able to actually focus our attention in the present moment most of the time is actually not very easy for most people.  Usually most people only manage it for short periods of time.

Martial arts are great for bringing you into the present moment!  If for example you are doing pre-arranged sparring and you facing somebody of a high standard, you know that if you don’t block/parry/evade, they’ll probably take your head off.  That tends to focus the mind and shut out any thoughts of that row you had with your spouse, that stressful drive home after work or how you’d like to practice you most dangerous techniques on that illegitimate son of a . . . . . . female dog . . . . . . boss of yours at work.  You are purely focused on this guy in front of you with a sinister expression on face, his eyes locked into your eyes and he moves like a bull on steroids (or at least it seems that way).

John Johnson shotokan karate2

Sensei John Johnson focuses his students attention on the present moment!

Everything else in the world, the past and future is shut out whilst you face this imminent threat, which you have to block and counter.  The little bit of adrenalin generated helps you to move faster and the exertion helps you to produce endorphins (the brains “happy” chemicals).  You are very present in the NOW and you feel good about it!

Any other form of exercise also generates endorphins which will help the feel-good factor.  However, losing a goal/point/match etc simply does not have the same urgency as facing Mr Bull-On-Steroids trying to take your head off.  By contrast, many people say that they enjoy jogging long distance as it allows them to get lost in their thoughts.  Whilst this can have benefits too, it is not the same being forced into now (or lose your head).

Even with the basics and kata, you are required to maintain considerable concentration on both the accuracy of the movement and the intent of the technique being performed.  There can be no getting lost in your thoughts here.  You can get a bit distracted worrying about whether you are keeping up with your classmates or not, though you really shouldn’t bother about this.  It is often said in martial arts that your main opponent is yourself, meaning you challenge yourself every time you train to continually improve.  If you do this then you should be very focused in the present, examining your own techniques as you perform them and putting your full intention into every movement.  Comparing yourself to others occasionally is alright as a way to measure your progress, but is not an end in itself.

All aspects of martial arts training, (whether focussing on perfecting technique or being partnered with somebody about to try to take your head off) will help you to focus in the moment.  There will be times when you think, “oh no, he’s going to take my head off”, which is again looking into the future (albeit a few seconds into the future) rather than being in the precise moment.  Some people will be consumed by such negative thoughts on a very regular basis.  As discussed in a previous post, practicing Moksu and Mushin will help to silence these thoughts.  However, training in an environment where we are constantly forced to focus on the present moment will also help us to silence those self doubting thoughts as well.

When you need to be very intensely in the present moment then it is very important to be able to silence any thoughts which by their very nature take you out of that moment.  When faced by somebody about to take your head off, the precise present moment is where your attention needs to be.  This is true both in training and when defending yourself from a real life assault.  When you partner up with somebody who is experienced, they just seem to have an air of certainty about them.  A black belt will usually only be very fractionally faster than say a brown belt.  However, the black belt will usually have a far greater air of confidence and self assuredness when compared to lower grades.  This is often referred to as fighting spirit, the focus of ones will and clarity of purpose with no (or at least, very few) mental distractions or doubts.

Jamie Clubb2People who have achieved this level of spirit in training and/or in real life altercations will very often be a force to be reckoned with in other areas of their lives too.  If they can be very present under the intensity of combat (even simulated) then they will be able to some extent to transfer this presence and focus to other areas of their lives.

I read years ago that soldiers who have been in actual combat reported afterwards that they have never felt “so alive”.  That is not because they actually enjoyed the combat, but the fact they could die any second is a great incentive to intensely focus themselves in the present moment.  I’m not suggesting that we all rush of and join the force and seek real combat, but our martial arts training does have some overlap with this phenomenon!

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Striving For Perfection: Combat Effectiveness And Spiritual Development

How often have you heard the phrase “before you can overcome others, you must first overcome yourself”, or “your main opponent is yourself”.  If you’ve never heard these phrases, then take a long look at who’s teaching you!  You should have heard these phrases before as this really is one of the most central core philosophies of doing any traditional martial art.

Whether you are looking for effective self defence, sport or simply aesthetic mastery of the art you practice you must first develop co-ordination, agility, speed, power, poise, balance and grace.  From a combative point of view, the need for speed, power, co-ordination and balance are obvious; but grace?  Do we need to be graceful in a fight?  Many consider the very act of fighting to be very disgraceful.

However, if you execute a technique and for whatever reason the opponent deals with it and counters, you have to react exceedingly fast to defend against his counter.  This kind of speed requires an instinctive reaction rather than a thought or reasoned one.  If we are focusing on strength, we become rigid (the more you tense a muscle the less it can move).  If we are rigid, then we cannot react very fast to an abrupt reversal in the fight and we have to hope we can absorb the punishment long enough for us to recover the initiative.

John was renown for his fantastic leg sweeps

Whilst we would all no doubt agree that the ability to absorb punishment is useful, I’m sure that we would also all agree that it is not something that we should rely on as a fighting strategy.  If we can move out of the way with ease and fluidity, we don’t have to absorb so much punishment and can regain the initiative much more quickly by simply not being where our opponent expects us to be.  To move very quickly like this requires a high level of fluidity, and fluidity requires graceful movement!  Don’t be fooled into thinking that grace lacks power, as it is quite the opposite.  Grace comes from perfection of technique and perfection of technique comes from mastering the self.  This brings us back to our opening paragraph about overcoming yourself before you can overcome anybody else.

This is why so many traditional martial arts place so much emphasis on drilling basics and kata, and why these are very often done before any partner activity.  In the modern world where there is an upsurge in what has become known as “reality based martial arts” and the pressure testing of mixed martial arts cage fighting; traditional martial arts have become seen by many as obsolete, too stylised and more for sport or self development than for real world self protection.

Note:  Reality based martial arts are often scenario based.  It may include shouting, swearing, abuse and verbal threats to psychologically prepare the defender as this is obviously more real to a street confrontation.  Sometimes even high grade martial artists do not know how to deal with this raw aggression and psychological pressure.

It is often pointed out that many traditional martial arts applications only work when the attacker is co-operative and conveniently attacks with a single straight punch (or kick) then freezes whilst the defender practices his counter.

These charges do hold a lot of merit.  However, reality based martial arts can easily be included into traditional martial arts (and in my view, should be) and there are many people researching practical applications to replace the pre-arranged stylised attacks and counters that are still very widely taught.

Traditional martial arts however, are more technique based than scenario based and goes deeply into perfection of movement.  Is this waste of time compared with learning the psychological aspects of scenario based training?

To draw an analogy, many professional dancers in the big shows, backing the world’s most famous pop stars have a foundation in ballet.  Ballet is such a precise and co-ordinated art form that once the dancer is adept in it, he/she can apply that high level of control and co-ordination to almost any other form of dance.

Some of the most charismatic actors have a background in Shakespeare.  Look at the authority and commanding screen presence of actors like Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen.  The classical background in most cases (dancing, acting, martial arts and others) gives the practitioner a deep foundation on which almost anything can be built.

Kevin O’Hagan, internationally renowned teacher of reality based martial arts and author of many books has said that traditional martial artists always pick up the reality based teachings more quickly than those who have not.

Seeking perfection of technique is not only developing us physically and mentally, but is actually very practical in the long term for building a foundation for self defence skills.  Over the years I have visited many martial arts clubs.  In one particular Kung Fu club, the instructor was proud to tell me that he made all his classes different every time.  He did not bore his students with endless repetition.  One of students agreed enthusiastically, telling me how he used to do Shotokan Karate and got bored drilling the same old basics every single class.  However, this student who had done the Shotokan drilling stuck out amongst the rest and was clearly better than the other students.  The repeated drilling had given him a foundation and an advantage that he had not appreciated.

I want to make clear that this is not a criticism of Kung Fu, only the way that this particular instructor taught it.

Striving for perfection, even though we know that we’ll never actually reach it, does in itself also develop a certain mindset.  A mindset of wanting to make something the best it possibly can be.  This has many connotations for other areas of our lives, be it school, work, relationships, driving, other hobbies, whatever!

The Japanese have the concept of delayed gratification.  This is also known in the West, but is not emphasised as much.  The idea is that we work at something over a period of time and delay our feeling of gratification until we have achieved it.  Like a grading for example.  Even going through the Kyu gradings (coloured belts) we have to wait 3 months in between each one.  But when we do pass it, we have a feeling of gratification which lasts.  When we get our 1st Dan the feeling of gratification is much stronger and lasts much longer.  We still have a feeling of pride years afterwards as we know that we have achieved a benchmark in our training.  For many of us, it even becomes part of how we identify ourselves, which along as it is not accompanied by arrogance is a good thing.

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERAToo many people, especially in the West are very much into instant gratification, be it drink, drugs, sex, smoking, or just watching a good movie.  I’m not saying that these things are necessarily bad (being a normal healthy guy myself who . . . . err . . . . likes a good movie); but if they are our only sources of gratification in life, then they will be short lived as there is not much to sustain us and maintain a feeling of fulfilment from one source/event of gratification to the next.   We are therefore not really at peace with ourselves.

Having a long term goal, a long term project or training regime does give us that something to sustain us and help us maintain a feeling of fulfilment in between the other more instant sources of gratification.

There are countless things that people can work on, train for, set goals about; but few can inspire for a lifetime like martial arts.  In most sports or physical pursuits people reach a peak then tend to move on as they age.  Martial arts (when taught properly) can be adapted as we age and we can work on other aspects.  In our youth it is good to make the most of our raw athleticism of, but as we get older we may focus on for example our timing and deception.  No matter how much we know, how much we’ve trained, how much we’ve taught; there is still something else we can work on and improve however old we get.

The fact that we will never reach perfection means that we can spend our whole lifetime looking for it and rather than feeling bored we feel fulfilled the closer we get to it.  This is part of where spiritual development comes into martial arts, something often referred to but seldom explained.

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Posted in Karate, Kung Fu, Philosophy / Spiritual, Self Development, Tae Kwon Do/Tang Soo Do/Hapkido, Tai Chi | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment